Selected Publications

Google Scholar profile

(e-mail for reprints)

2017

Drury, J., Grether, G., Garland, T., & Morlon, H. 2017. An assessment of phylogenetic tools for analyzing the interplay between interspecific interactions and phenotypic evolution. Systematic Biology. doi:10.1093/sysbio/syx079

Putman, B., Drury, J., Blumstein, D., & Pauly, G. 2017. Fear no colors? Observer clothing color influences lizard escape behavior. PLOS One. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0182146
· covered by NPR and Scientific American

2016

Drury, J., Clavel, J., Manceau, M., & Morlon, H. 2016. Estimating the effect of competition on trait evolution using maximum likelihood inference. Systematic Biology. doi:10.1093/sysbio/syw020

Losin, N., Drury, J., Peiman, K., Storch, C., & Grether, G.2016. The ecological and evolutionary stability of interspecific territoriality. Ecology Letters. doi:10.1111/ele.12561

Morlon, H., Lewitus, E., Condamine, F., Manceau, M., Clavel, J., & Drury, J. 2016. RPANDA: an R package for macroevolutionary analyses on phylogenetic trees. Methods in Ecology & Evolution. doi:10.1111/2041-210X.12526

Drury, J. & Burroughs, N. 2016. Nest shape explains variation in sexual dichromatism in New World blackbirds. Journal of Avian Biology. doi:10.1111/jav.00757

2015

Hensley, N., Drury, J., Garland, T., & Blumstein, D. 2015. Vivid birds do not initiate flight sooner despite their potential conspicuousness. Current Zoology. 61(4): 773-780

Drury, J., Anderson, C., & Grether, G. 2015. Seasonal polyphenism in wing coloration affects species recognition in rubyspot damselflies (Hetaerina spp.). Journal of Evolutionary Biology. doi:10.1111/jeb.12665

Grether, G., Drury, J., Berlin, E., & Anderson, C. 2015. The role of wing coloration in sex recognition and competitor recognition in rubyspot damselflies (Hetaerina spp.). Ethology. doi:10.1111/eth.12382

Drury, J., Okamoto, K., Anderson, C., & Grether, G. 2015. Reproductive interference explains persistence of aggression between species. Proceedings of the Royal Society: B. doi:10.1098/rspb.2014.2256
·covered by UCLA Newsroom

Before 2015

Drury, J. & Grether, G. 2014. Interspecific aggression, not interspecific mating, drives character displacement in the wing coloration of male rubyspot damselflies (Hetaerina).  Proceedings of the Royal Society: B. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2014.1737
· covered by Anole Annals

Grether, G., Anderson, C., Drury, J., Kirschel, A., Losin, N., Okamoto, K., & Peiman, K. 2013. The evolutionary consequences of interspecific aggression. Annals of the NY Academy of Sciences. doi: 10.1111/nyas.12082

Journey, L., Drury, J., Haymer, M., Rose, K. & Blumstein, D. 2013. Vivid birds respond more to acoustic signals of predators. Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology. doi: 10.1007/s00265- 013-1556-z

Anderson, C., Córdoba-Aguilar, A., Drury, J., & Grether, G. 2011. An assessment of marking techniques for odonates in the family Calopterygidae. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 141:258-261. doi: 10.1111/j.1570-7458.2011.01185.x

Drury, J. & Gowaty, P. 2010. Social Selection, Sexual Selection, and Sexual Conflict. In: Encyclopedia of Animal Behavior (Eds. M Breed and J. Moore) Academic Press, San Diego.

Drury, J. 2010. Immunity & mate choice: a new outlook. Animal Behaviour 79:539-545. doi:10.1016/j.anbehav.2009.12.023